Maarten Bolhuis

Maarten Bolhuis

Talks covered by this speaker

14

Organized crime around the globe

Categories covered by Maarten

About this Speaker

Personal information

Maarten Bolhuis is Assistant Professor of Criminology at the Faculty of Law. He is a graduate in criminology and political science at VU Amsterdam and the University of Amsterdam. He worked at the Dutch human rights NGO Lawyers for Lawyers, and the Amsterdam Bar Association, before starting as a researcher/lecturer at VU Amsterdam in 2012. In 2018, he obtained his PhD at VU Amsterdam. He is Programme Coordinator of the MSc in International Crimes, Conflict & Criminology, board member at the Center for International Criminal Justice (CICJ), and member of the Amsterdam Laboratory for Legal Psychology (ALLP).


Research

Maarten Bolhuis conducts research in the programme Empirical and normative studies. He took part in the Escaping Justice Project, which focused on the implications of the application of article 1F Refugee Convention. On the basis of this article, persons who are believed to be guilty of committing international crimes, such as crimes against humanity and war crimes, are excluded from refugee protection. As part of this, his PhD thesis focused on the role countries of refuge play in criminal prosecution of these alleged perpetrators of serious criminality.


The In Limbo Project builds upon previous projects in which Maarten has participated, but expands the scope of the previous research, to the situation of immigrants who are undesirable because of (alleged) criminality, but who cannot be returned or deported from the host country (undesirable but unreturnable aliens). The project's aim is to publish an accessible book for a wider audience.


Maarten Bolhuis co-supervises the PhD project of Mohammad Hossein Mojtahedi.


Teaching

Conflict & Crimes

Transnational Organized Crime & Conflict

Terrorism & Security

Research Methodology on Conflict and International Crimes

Project Gerede Twijfel

Summer School on International Criminal Justice

Transitional Justice in Reality

Bachelor theses

Master theses



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